Florida wildlife sanctuary expanding help animals

A Jupiter mainstay for the past 40 years is expanding to a new, larger location in Jupiter Farms to care for a growing number of sick and injured animals.The Busch Wildlife Sanctuary is about five acres and last year, cared for more than 6,000 injured or sick animals.Florida Fish and Wildlife: Experts working around the clock to feed starving manatees“In the past four years, we’ve doubled the amount of visitors who’ve come to see us,” Amy Kight, the organization’s executive director said. “We’ve also seen a 25% increase in the number of patients in the past three years.”The new location will be 20 acres and will help the staff and volunteers care for the growing number of patients and visitors.“It will be five acres strictly for rehabilitation, 10 for education and then five acres left natural,” Kight said. “It just really gives us the opportunity to grow, give our animals a better quality of life and to educate more people.”Drone video: Hammerhead shark swims near paddleboarders in Palm Beach Peter Busch started the sanctuary as a “backyard operation.” He and his son David are now on the Board. While rehabilitating animals is one of the sanctuary’s goals, Peter says the other is educating the community about species native to Florida. “We have to look at this not just from our point of view right now, we have to look at it from what it’s going to be in 10 years, 20 years, 30 years when we’re no longer here,” he said. “We have to educate our kids and our grandkids.”More than 90% of the animals brought to the sanctuary are because of human-caused injuries or illnesses, according to Sanctuary leaders.Stay informed: Local coverage from WPBF 25 NewsThey believe more education will lead to fewer intakes in the future. “The more we educate, the better off those animals will be and the better off the next generation will be in understanding what we do,” Busch said. The new facility was originally projected to cost about $10 million dollars, but with pandemic-related supply chain issues, that figure is now closer to $15 million. Wednesday the state of Florida announced it would allocate some money for the organization and Palm Beach County Commissioner, Maria Marino said she hopes the county can find money to help as well. Twitter | instagram

A Jupiter mainstay for the past 40 years is expanding to a new, larger location in Jupiter Farms to care for a growing number of sick and injured animals.

The Busch Wildlife Sanctuary is about five acres and last year, cared for more than 6,000 injured or sick animals.

Florida Fish and Wildlife: Experts working around the clock to feed starving manatees

“In the past four years, we’ve doubled the amount of visitors who’ve come to see us,” Amy Kight, the organization’s executive director said. “We’ve also seen a 25% increase in the number of patients in the past three years.”

The new location will be 20 acres and will help the staff and volunteers care for the growing number of patients and visitors.

“It will be five acres strictly for rehabilitation, 10 for education and then five acres left natural,” Kight said. “It just really gives us the opportunity to grow, give our animals a better quality of life and to educate more people.”

Drone video: Hammerhead shark swims near paddleboarders in Palm Beach

Peter Busch started the sanctuary as a “backyard operation.” He and his son David are now on the Board.

While rehabilitating animals is one of the sanctuary’s goals, Peter says the other is educating the community about species native to Florida.

“We have to look at this not just from our point of view right now, we have to look at it from what it’s going to be in 10 years, 20 years, 30 years when we’re no longer here,” he said. “We have to educate our kids and our grandkids.”

More than 90% of the animals brought to the sanctuary are because of human-caused injuries or illnesses, according to Sanctuary leaders.

Stay informed: Local coverage from WPBF 25 News

They believe more education will lead to fewer intakes in the future.

“The more we educate, the better off those animals will be and the better off the next generation will be in understanding what we do,” Busch said.

The new facility was originally projected to cost about $10 million dollars, but with pandemic-related supply chain issues, that figure is now closer to $15 million.

Wednesday the state of Florida announced it would allocate some money for the organization and Palm Beach County Commissioner, Maria Marino said she hopes the county can find money to help as well.

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