Dozens of birds at NH sanctuary euthanized

Dozens of birds have been euthanized after New Hampshire’s first confirmed case of the current avian flu strain in domestic birds.The owners of Pumpkin Wall Farm animal sanctuary said they’re devastated that dozens of their animals have to be euthanized, but they’re hoping it can be a teaching moment for other farm owners.Brendena and Bill Fleming said they spent the day Friday at a lake with their four children away from their Derry home.”I can’t be there, and I don’t want my kids to be there around that,” Brendena Fleming said. State workers were at the animal sanctuary euthanizing what she estimated to be about 80 of her birds.”This loss is so devastating that we’re just going to have to live on the memories of what it was like,” she said. Brendena Fleming said she rescues all kinds of animals and brings them to Pumpkin Wall Farm. This week, five of her turkeys suddenly died. She said she contacted the state veterinarian, who determined they had avian flu.”All our animals at the sanctuary have their own habitats,” Brendena Fleming said. “It’s not a farm where everybody’s mixed together.”She said wild ducks carrying the disease landed in their pond and infected the flock. The rest of her chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys then had to be put down.”They said, ‘Your farm is amazing. It’s immaculate. It’s clean. You did everything right. This isn’t your fault,'” Brendena Fleming said. “We’re not set up to have nets over an acre of land.”State officials said this was the first confirmed diagnosis of that strain of avian flu in domestic birds in New Hampshire. They said there’s not a concern for food safety, and the risk to people is low.”I pray my story will help other farmers,” Brendena Fleming said. about five months. The owners said they might consider releasing some geese into the pond on Labor Day weekend.

Dozens of birds have been euthanized after New Hampshire’s first confirmed case of the current avian flu strain in domestic birds.

The owners of Pumpkin Wall Farm animal sanctuary said they’re devastated that dozens of their animals have to be euthanized, but they’re hoping it can be a teaching moment for other farm owners.

Brendena and Bill Fleming said they spent the day Friday at a lake with their four children away from their Derry home.

“I can’t be there, and I don’t want my kids to be there around that,” Brendena Fleming said.

State workers were at the animal sanctuary euthanizing what she estimated to be about 80 of her birds.

“This loss is so devastating that we’re just going to have to live on the memories of what it was like,” she said.

Brendena Fleming said she rescues all kinds of animals and brings them to Pumpkin Wall Farm. This week, five of her turkeys suddenly died.

She said she contacted the state veterinarian, who determined they had avian flu.

“All our animals at the sanctuary have their own habitats,” Brendena Fleming said. “It’s not a farm where everybody’s mixed together.”

She said wild ducks carrying the disease landed in their pond and infected the flock. The rest of her chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys then had to be put down.

“They said, ‘Your farm is amazing. It’s immaculate. It’s clean. You did everything right. This isn’t your fault,'” Brendena Fleming said. “We’re not set up to have nets over an acre of land.”

State officials said this was the first confirmed diagnosis of that strain of avian flu in domestic birds in New Hampshire. They said there’s not a concern for food safety, and the risk to people is low.

“I pray my story will help other farmers,” Brendena Fleming said.

She said that by state law, they can’t do anything on the farm for about five months. The owners said they might consider releasing some geese into the pond on Labor Day weekend.

.

Leave a Comment